Meetings and seminars were held with the participation of Austrian partners

Jenns Peter Ennen, Director of the Transnational Program at the Krems University of Applied Sciences, Austria, and Martina Kugler-Vielkind, International Relations Specialist, visited Tashkent State University of Economics on November 26-28.

The visit included a number of meetings, seminars and lectures. Students had a chance to learn more about their field of study. During the Austrian Program Director held a meeting with the teachers of the joint programme  and discussed the plans for further improvement of the content of the lectures. At the end of the visit, the sides discussed the achievements of the program, as well as the problems that need to be addressed in order to increase the effectiveness of the project.

A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.

Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.

One never injured multi-marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.

Francesca Stoppard The Darvin B. Xander Associate Curator of Prints

With most runners being heel-strikers today, the added shock, multiplied over thousands of footsteps, could explain high injury rates. The 2012 study added fuel to the debate, finding a two-to-one difference in repetitive stress injuries between heel- and forefoot-strikers.

Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. Jane and colleagues recruited 249 female recreational athletes who each ran at least 20 miles a week. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.

The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.

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